Implications:

Country

Infrastructure

Culture

Globalisation

United Arab Emirates

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In the top 25% in world rankings for infrastructure. A wealthy population. In a good position to embrace current e-learning technologies.
Students are likely to prefer clearly structured courses and may find any form of reflective practice or critical thinking challenging.
English language instruction would be viewed as normal.
On balance it seems that globalisation is seen as a positive influence. While globalised e-learning courses may challenge some cultural norms and promote the use of English they are unlikely to seriously erode the strongly embedded Islamic cultural traditions.

India

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Not in the top 10% in world rankings for infrastructure but has 82% world ranking. Not a wealthy population, but still showing positivity to embrace current e-learning technologies.
Similar to the United Arab Emirates students are likely to prefer clearly structured courses and may find any form of reflective practice or critical thinking challenging.
English language instruction would be viewed as normal
On the whole, similar to UAE globalisation has a tremendous positive influence on India. Eventhough the challenges broughtforth by globalised e-learning courses are challenging, India has begun to show her postitive attitude in embracing e-learning courses to place herself on the competitive global arena. The adoption of e-learning technologies enabled India to shake the cultural norms which she holds very dearly in the pursuit of its e-learning goals.

New Zealand

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